Instant Pot Bone Broth

Learn how to make Nutrient Rich Instant Pot Bone Broth Recipe (Pressure Cooker Bone Broth) from our 10+ Experiments! Super easy without simmering for hours.

Learn how to make Nutrient Rich Instant Pot Bone Broth Recipe (Pressure Cooker Bone Broth). Enjoy the health benefits with this super easy, hands-off, economical way to make bone broth without simmering for hours on the stove!! Perfect for consuming directly or culinary use.

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5 from 26 votes

Bone broth has gained rapid popularity in North America in recent years due to the health benefits it brings.

But bone broth is hardly a new invention around the world! In fact, it has been a way of life and a core part of Cantonese cuisine since the ancient years.

Pork bones, beef bones, fish bones are some of the common ingredients for making Asian bone broth/soups. Sometimes we’d even add natural Chinese medicinal ingredients for an extra boost of health benefits. 🙂

Cantonese mamas often pride themselves for their homemade, nourishing & delicious broths/soups. A sip of mom’s soup is like a warm comforting hug on a cold day!

Try it! Related Recipes:

Bid farewell to store-bought Bone Broth and make your own at home!!

What is Bone Broth?


Bone Broth is made by simmering animal bones, meat, vegetables, herbs with water. It’s normally simmered for hours and hours on the stove to extract the flavor and nutrients.

Learn how to make Nutrient Rich Instant Pot Bone Broth Recipe (Pressure Cooker Bone Broth) from our 10+ Experiments! Super easy without simmering for hours.

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Why is Bone Broth Good for Us?

  • Boosts immune system (Protects against common cold and flu)
  • Improves digestion & strengthens your digestive tract
  • Improves allergies
  • Heals your gut and reduces intestinal inflammation
  • Supports joints, hair, skin, nails due to high collagen content

Time for another Instant Pot Experiment!! 🙂

How to Cut the Vegetables?


Before we jump into our Pressure Cooker Bone Broth Experiment, we’d like to first decide how are we cutting the veggies? Does it matter?

In our previous experiment for Instant Pot Vegetable Stock, we tested to see if the 2 vegetables cutting methods – Roughly Diced vs. Halved – will yield different results. If so, how? And which one is better?

We concluded that the “Roughly Diced” version turned out to taste better (more balanced flavor) with a nicer color.

Make Healthy Instant Pot Vegetable Stock Recipe Experiment (Pressure Cooker Vegetable Stock): Roughly Chopped vs. Halved Veggies

So that’s why our Instant Pot Bone Broth Recipe will use diced veggies! 🙂

Instant Pot Bone Broth Experiment


What we look for in a great pot of bone broth?

  • Flavors: depth of flavors with body; balanced between savory & sweet; harmony between meat/bones & veggies (including herbs & spices)
  • Texture: able to gel after chilling in the fridge
  • Color: golden brown (but not deep brown)
Learn how to make Nutrient Rich Instant Pot Bone Broth Recipe (Pressure Cooker Bone Broth): Sauteed or Roasted vs. Not Roasted Experiment
Sauteed bones vs. Non-sauteed bones

Pressure Cooker Bone Broth Experiment


Pressure Cooker: Instant Pot Electric Pressure Cooker
Altitude: close to sea level
Pressure: High Pressure (10.15~11.6 psi)
Bones: Sauteed vs. Non-Sauteed
Pressure Cooking Time: 30 mins, 1 hr, 2 hrs, 4 hrs, 12 hrs
Release Method: Natural Release

We conducted 10+ tests with the same ingredients using Sauteed vs. Non-Sauteed Bones & different cooking times in our Instant Pot Electric Pressure Cooker.

Pressure Cooker Bone Broth Experiment Results


Our bone broth evaluation is based on 3 factors: Flavors, Color, and Gelatinous Level after chilling in the fridge.

Learn how to make Nutrient Rich Instant Pot Bone Broth Recipe (Pressure Cooker Bone Broth) Experiment Results

A Closer Look at the Bone Broth’s Gelatinous Level


Test #1 – Sauteed Bones @ High Pressure 30 mins

  • Gel Level: Little gel
  • Color: Light gold

How to make Instant Pot Bone Broth (Pressure Cooker Bone Broth) Experiment Test #1 Results

Test #2 – Non-Sauteed Bones @ High Pressure 30 mins

  • Gel Level: Liquidy, thin
  • Color: Light gold (lighter than Test #1)

How to make Instant Pot Bone Broth (Pressure Cooker Bone Broth) Experiment Test #2 Results

Test #3 – Sauteed Bones @ High Pressure 1 hr

  • Gel Level: Started to gel
  • Color: Light golden brown (slightly darker than Test #1 & Test #4)

How to make Instant Pot Bone Broth (Pressure Cooker Bone Broth) Experiment Test #3 Results

Test #4 – Non-Sauteed Bones @ High Pressure 1 hr

  • Gel Level: Started to gel
  • Color: Light golden brown (slightly lighter than Test #3)

How to make Instant Pot Bone Broth (Pressure Cooker Bone Broth) Experiment Test #4 Results

Test #5 – Sauteed Bones @ High Pressure 2 hrs*

  • Gel Level: Best gelatinous texture (thicker gel than Test #6)
  • Color: Golden brown

How to make Instant Pot Bone Broth (Pressure Cooker Bone Broth) Experiment Test #5 Results

Test #6 – Non-Sauteed Bones @ High Pressure 2 hrs

  • Gel Level: Nice gel
  • Color: Golden brown (slightly lighter than Test #5, darker than Test #4)

How to make Instant Pot Bone Broth (Pressure Cooker Bone Broth) Experiment Test #6 Results

Instant Pot Bone Broth Experiment Results Data:

Instant Pot Bone Broth (Pressure Cooker Bone Broth) Experiment Results
(Click photo to enlarge chart)

*HP = High Pressure

Instant Pot Bone Broth Experiment Conclusions:

  • Longer pressure cooking time doesn’t always mean the bone broth will turn out better or tastes better.
  • Sauteed bones always produce a richer taste & darker broth color than the Non-Sauteed versions.

Weighing the three factors, our desired result in pressure cooking bone broth is Test #5. It produced the best overall flavor, gelatinous texture, and color.

You’ll Enjoy Instant Pot Bone Broth Because:

  • Healthy & nutritious – soothing, nourishing, rich in minerals
  • Super easy & inexpensive to make!
  • No need to leave your stove on overnight and simmer for hours & hours
  • Can consume directly or used in soups, sauces, stews, or other dishes (adds complexity and depths of flavors)
  • Tested recipe that produces a balance taste – a sweet & savory quality Instant Pot Bone Broth

Ingredients for Instant Pot Bone Broth Recipe


Learn how to make Nutrient Rich Instant Pot Bone Broth Recipe (Pressure Cooker Bone Broth) from our 10+ Experiments: Recipe Ingredients

  • 2.5 – 3 pounds (1198g) bones (combination of 554g pork, 644g chicken)
  • Optional: 5 – 6 (212g) chicken feet
  • 2 onions (252g keep the outer layers), roughly diced
  • 2 (215g) celery stalks, roughly diced
  • 2 (265g) carrots, roughly diced
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 (8g) garlic cloves, crushed
  • 1 teaspoon (3.5g) whole peppercorn
  • 8 cups (2L) cold water
  • 2 tablespoons (30ml) light soy sauce (not low sodium soy sauce) or fish sauce
  • Your favorite fresh or dried herbs
  • 1 tablespoon (15ml) apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon (15ml) olive oil

Learn how to make Nutrient Rich Instant Pot Bone Broth Recipe (Pressure Cooker Bone Broth) from our 10+ Experiments: combination of chicken and pork bones

Instructions for Instant Pot Bone Broth Recipe


Step 1
Optional Step to Enhance the Bone Broth

Ingredients & Tool

Instant Pot Electric Pressure Cooker

1 tablespoon (15ml) olive oil
2.5 – 3 pounds (1198g) bones (combination of 554g pork, 644g chicken)
½ cup (125ml) cold water

Heat up your pressure cooker over medium high heat

  • Instant Pot: press Sauté button and click the Adjust button to go to Sauté More function

how to use instant pot - saute more function

Make sure your pot is as hot as it can be

  • Instant Pot: wait until the indicator says HOT

Add 1 tablespoon (15ml) olive oil in the pot and brown the bones for 3.5 minutes per side.

*Note: You may have to do it in two batches.

Pour in ½ cup (125ml) cold water and completely deglaze the pot by scrubbing all flavorful brown bits with a wooden spoon.

Step 2
Pressure Cook Bone Broth

Ingredients

Optional: 5 – 6 (212g) chicken feet
2 onions (252g keep the outer layers), roughly diced
2 (215g) celery stalks, roughly diced
2 (265g) carrots, roughly diced
2 bay leaves
2 (8g) garlic cloves, crushed
1 teaspoon (3.5g) whole peppercorn
7 ½ cups (1875ml) cold water
2 tablespoons (30ml) light soy sauce (not low sodium soy sauce) or fish sauce
Your favorite fresh or dried herbs
1 tablespoon (15ml) apple cider vinegar

Add 5 – 6 (212g) chicken feet (optional) and the rest of the ingredients in the pressure cooker.

Learn how to make Nutrient Rich Instant Pot Bone Broth Recipe (Pressure Cooker Bone Broth): optional chicken feet

*Pro Tip: Even though it’s optional, the nutrient-packed chicken feet is a key component to making a rich and gelatinous bone broth!

Close lid and Pressure Cook at

  • Pressure Cooking Method: High pressure for 2 hours, then Full Natural Release (~45 mins)

Open the lid carefully.

Step 3
Strain Bone Broth

Tool

Colander

Strain bone broth through a colander or mesh strainer to discard the solids.

Set aside the bone broth to cool.

Step 4
Skim Fat

Tool
OXO Good Grips 4-Cup Fat Separator
  • Quickly separates unwanted fat from flavorful juices
  • BPA-free, heat-resistant plastic

2 Methods to Skim the Fat:

  • Use a fat separator
  • Place bone broth in the fridge until the fat rises to the top and form a layer of gel. Then, skim the layer of fat with a spoon.

*Pro Tip: A gel-like texture after cooling is a good indicator of an excellent gelatinous bone broth.

Step 5
Enjoy Instant Pot Bone Broth


Season with salt (if desired) and drink it directly.

Or you can use the Bone Broth in place of stock.

Step 6
Store Instant Pot Bone Broth


Chill in Fridge: You can store the bone broth in the fridge for 3 – 5 days.

Freezing Bone Broth: If you are freezing the bone broth, use within a year for best quality.

We love using this Silicone mold for freezing our broth or stocks.

Freshware CB-105RD 12-Cavity Petite Silicone Mold for Soap, Bread, Loaf, Muffin, Brownie,...
  • Flexible and Non-Stick. Baked Goods Pop Out Easily. Reusable For Up to 3,000 Uses
  • 100% Pure, Professional Quality Food-Grade Silicone. Meets US FDA and European LFGB Safety...
  • Great individual portion for consuming or cooking
  • When frozen in blocks, they’re easy to store, and they thaw easily & quickly
  • Super convenient to use & easy to wash
  • You can use it for baking too!

How to Make Instant Pot Bone Broth Freezer Silicone Mold

We put it in the freezer as shown in the picture above. After they freeze in the mold, they pop out very easily (as shown in the picture below). Then, we store them in ziploc freezer bags.

Frozen Instant Pot Stock

How to transfer the mold to freezer: to make things easier, we like to put this Silicone Mold on top of a baking sheet, pour the broth or stock into the mold, then place the baking sheet with the mold in the freezer.

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Learn how to make Nutrient Rich Instant Pot Bone Broth Recipe (Pressure Cooker Bone Broth) from our 10+ Experiments! Super easy without simmering for hours.

Instant Pot Bone Broth

Learn how to make Nutrient Rich Instant Pot Bone Broth Recipe (Pressure Cooker Bone Broth) from our 10+ Experiments! Super easy without simmering for hours.
5 from 26 votes
Print Rate This Recipe
Prep Time: 10 minutes
Cook Time: 3 hours 10 minutes
Total: 3 hours 20 minutes
Servings: 16
Calories: 54kcal
Author: Amy + Jacky

Ingredients

  • 2.5 - 3 pounds (1198g) bones (combination of 554g pork, 644g chicken)
  • 5 - 6 (212g) chicken feet
  • 2 (252g) onions keep the outer layers, roughly diced
  • 2 (215g) celery stalks , roughly diced
  • 2 (265g) carrots , roughly diced
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 (8g) garlic cloves , crushed
  • 1 teaspoon (3.5g) whole peppercorn
  • 8 cups (2L) cold water
  • 2 tablespoons (30ml) fish sauce or light soy sauce
  • Your favorite fresh or dried herbs
  • 1 tablespoon (15ml) apple cider vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon (15ml) olive oil

Instructions

  • Optional Step to Enhance the Bone Broth: Heat up your pressure cooker over medium high heat (Instant Pot: press Sauté button and click the Adjust button to go to Sauté More function). Make sure your pot is as hot as it can be (Instant Pot: wait until the indicator says HOT).
    Add 1 tablespoon (15ml) olive oil in the pot and brown the bones for 3.5 minutes per side. You may have to do it in two batches. Pour in ½ cup (125ml) cold water and completely deglaze the pot by scrubbing all flavorful brown bits with a wooden spoon.
  • Pressure Cook Bone Broth: Add 5 - 6 (212g) chicken feet (optional) and the rest of the ingredients in the pressure cooker. Close lid and pressure cook at High pressure for 2 hours + Full Natural Release (~45 mins). Open the lid carefully.
  • Strain Bone Broth: Strain bone broth through a colander or mesh strainer to discard the solids. Set aside the bone broth to cool.
  • Skim Fat: Use a fat separator to skim the fat. An alternative method is to place bone broth in the fridge until the fat rises to the top and form a layer of gel. Then, skim the layer of fat with a spoon. A gel-like texture after cooling is a good indicator of an excellent gelatinous bone broth.
  • Enjoy Bone Broth: Season with salt (if desired) and drink it directly. Or you can use the Bone Broth in place of stock.
  • Storage: Bone broth can be stored in the fridge for 3 - 5 days. If you are freezing the bone broth, use within a year for best quality.
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Spread the Love by sharing this recipe, so others can enjoy it too!  Thank you 🙂

Nutrition:

Calories: 54kcal | Carbohydrates: 3g | Protein: 3g | Fat: 2g | Cholesterol: 11mg | Sodium: 157mg | Potassium: 123mg | Fiber: 1g | Sugar: 1g | Vitamin A: 56.8% | Vitamin C: 3.3% | Calcium: 2.8% | Iron: 1.7%
Course: Dinner, Ingredient, Lunch, Soup, Stock, Super Easy, Vegetables
Cuisine: World
Tried this recipe?Mention @pressurecookrecipes or tag #AmyJacky!

 

Learn how to make Nutrient Rich Instant Pot Bone Broth Recipe (Pressure Cooker Bone Broth) from our 10+ Experiments! Super easy without simmering for hours.
Food Lovers in our 30s who worked directly with Instant Pot CEO, Manufacturers, and 35+ Restaurants. Culinary Families & Food Magazine Publishers.
    1. Hi Terri,

      It should only lose roughly 1 – 2 tablespoons of liquid under pressure.

      It sounds like the Instant Pot was not sealed properly and moisture were escaping during the cooking process.

      Please take care & have a wonderful weekend
      Jacky

  1. Thank you so much! I’m making this for a friend who is battling cancer. Your research has saved me so much time!!

    1. Hi Lisa,

      Thank you for doing this for your friend. You are so kind and I hope your friend will get well soon!!

      Please take care & have fun cooking
      Jacky

  2. Hello Amy + Jacky

    Thank you for taking the time to develop the wonderful details & recommendations in your cooking. I find these very interesting! My family & I love our pressure cooker & look forward to being on your mailing list.

    Regards

  3. Hi there! I definitely want to try this recipe, I was just curious if you use a 6 qt instant pot? I have a 3 qt one and wondered if I decrease the cook time as I’ll probably have to half the recipe.

    1. Hi Emily

      thank you for your question.

      Our recipes are developed in the 6 quarts and for most of them you will not need to divide the recipe in half (as long as the meat fits)

      For recipes with a lot of liquid such as chili, soups, pasta, congees, stocks…etc, you will want to cut them by half in the 3qt.

      The cooking time will stay the same!

      Have fun cooking & please take care
      Jacky

  4. I’ve been doing my bone broth on the stove top or in the slow cooker for years now. (I really only do it in the summer, but supplement with collagen peptides year round.) Now I keep hearing about this Instant Pot, and it’s sounding more and more tempting!

    1. Hi Kirsten,

      Hope you had a wonderful New Year 🙂
      Thank you for your question. Skimming the fat will make the bone broth less oily.

      Happy New Year & please take care
      Jacky

  5. Question… the nutritional information is great that it’s listed but I can’t seem to find anywhere that clarifies what serving size it is based on, could you please clarify?

    1. Hi Jacki,

      Hope you had a wonderful New Year 🙂
      Thank you so much for your kind words. It is based on a 1 cup serving.

      Happy New Year & please take care
      Jacky

  6. Hey,

    I was wondering if you peeled the chicken feet first before adding them? Or how you prepped the chicken feet before cooking with them.

    1. Hi Ashleigh,

      Hope you had a wonderful New Year 🙂
      Thank you for your question. This is an optional step, but you can parboil them in boiling water for 1 – 2 minutes first.

      Happy New Year & please take care
      Jacky

  7. I have made this twice and both times it has been great!!
    Thanks guys! If I’m looking for a recipe on line and your site
    comes up, it’s the first one I always go to!

  8. I followed this recipe but used beef bones under pressure for 3:45. My broth is rich and tasty but it did not gel at all. Will beef broth gel like chicken? Is there something like chicken feet that you’d add to the beef broth to get more collagen in it?

    1. Hi Kae,

      Hope you had a wonderful New Year & Christmas 🙂
      Thank you for your question. Chicken feet have a very high amount of collagen. I recommend adding a few in the beef bones broth!

      Happy New Year & please take care
      Jacky

  9. Food allergies so want to make fish bone broth only and new to Insant Pot. What adjustments do you suggest to the ingredients? Love your site!

    1. Hi Robyn,

      Hope you had a wonderful New Year & Christmas 🙂
      Thank you for your question. I love using salmon bones and head for fish bone broth.

      Add in some tomatoes, potatoes, onions, garlic to make it a full blown soup.

      Happy New Year & please take care
      Jacky

  10. Hi! I’m curious what you mean by leaving on the outer skins on the onion. Do you mean the dry skin or just the green but barely edible parts of the onion?

    1. Hi Rea,

      Hope you had a wonderful New Year & Christmas 🙂
      Thank you for your question. It’s the dry skin as well.

      Happy New Year & please take care
      Jacky

    1. Hi Anne,

      Hope you had a wonderful New Year & Christmas 🙂
      Thank you for your question. We use the usual suspects (rosemary, thyme, oregano..etc)

      Happy New Year & please take care
      Jacky

  11. Thank you, thank you, thank you!!! made test#5 yesterday, and for the first time my chicken broth gelled so well!!!

    Many thanks!
    Greetings from Switzerland
    D.

    1. Hi David,

      Thank you for your question.
      The bone broth will taste quite smokey. If you like it that way, it is delicious as well.

      Please take care & have fun cooking
      Jacky

  12. Would you be able to help my broth?
    I made my own bone broth in a slow cooker and after 48 hours, the marrow was still on the bones but had good gel. So I kept cooking it for several more days trying to get the marrow out. Which I didn’t even get half, but the broth turned really dark and bitter and all the gelatine cooked away and it’s totally thin with no fat at all. Did I ruin it? Not sure what’s going on…
    I find I like the taste best after 48 hours but I want all the best nutrition I can get!!!
    Thank you for any help you can offer!!!

    1. Hi Anna,

      thank you for your question and kind words 🙂

      The bitterness most likely came from the vegetables. If you would like to cook the bones for several days in a slow cooker, I would recommend adding the vegetables later.

      Take care & have fun cooking
      Jacky

  13. Hi, I was wondering, does the addition of the vinegar make the bone broth taste sour? I also bought chicken wings (I could not find chicken feet), I can just put the raw chicken wings into the pot without having to first put it in boiled water to remove any scum?

    1. Hi Gee,

      thank you for your question 🙂

      The small amount of vinegar will not make the bone broth tasting sour.

      For the raw chicken wings, you can boil them first to remove any scum or remove the scum after you have finished pressure cooking (It will be a bit more flavorful).

      Take care & have fun cooking
      Jacky

  14. I have some chicken backs and feet left over from my latest batch of bone broth and need more for a second batch but my butcher shop isn’t open during the week. Is it OK to use beef bones to combine with the chicken? If so, how long should I cook them? Thank you!!

    1. Hi Nancy,

      thank you for your question 🙂

      It will taste different, but it will work.

      I will still cook it for 2 – 3 hours.

      Take care & have fun cooking
      Jacky

  15. Hello!
    Thank you for your detailed article. I have made bone broth successfully a couple times in my IP. My sister says that I still need to cook it for a longer time ~ she cooks hers for 20 in the IP. Is that necessary? I used to cook my bone broth in the slow cooker for 24-48 hours. I have done it for 4 hours in my IP. I am curious about the nutritional benefits being the same as a slow cooker. And if my sister is over-achieving as usual. 😉
    I like that it is fast in the IP and in 5 hours I can have bone broth! I have just discovered you site, I am very excited to try your recipes!

    1. Hi Sofia,

      thank you for your kind words and question 🙂

      In my opinion, the optimized cooking time for nutritional benefit and taste-wise will be 2 – 4 hours.

      Take care & have fun cooking
      Jacky

  16. Hope I’m not too late for feedback… Traditional recipes say to cover the bones, but I have large beef bones and am wondering given the 2/3 full rule of the IP if the bones stick up out of the water a bit will that matter? Thanks for a great recipe, testing, and feedback.

    1. Hi Lee,

      Never too late 🙂 Thank you for your question.

      It is fine as it will only make a slight difference to the broth.

      Take care & have fun cooking
      Jacky

  17. Hi Amy+Jacky,
    I am new to broth maker and looking for an easy way (pardon my laziness) to get a good healthy broth. In many other conventional recipes with gas stoves, I saw that they firsf preboiled the bones first for 1 hour, throw away the dirt/black foam from the broth. How can we do it with Instant Pot then? Does it really necessary? Thank you.

    1. Hi Sylvia,

      Thank you for your question 🙂

      Parboiling is an optional step as the foam is mostly just protein.

      You can also use the saute more function to parboil first and then pressure cook after with the Instant Pot.

      Take care & have fun cooking
      Jacky

  18. Hello and thank you for your testing in making Bone Broth. Can you use bone marrow bones that are readily available in the grocery store?

  19. I’ve seen multiple recipes that list cooking times for slow simmered bone broths as beef – 48 hours, chicken – 24 hours, and fish – 8 hours. I’ve done poultry bone broth in a pressure cooker for 2 hours and it turned out great. I wonder if beef or fish bone broth should be pressure cooked a proportionate amount of time? (ie beef -48 hours, and fish – 40 minutes) I’d love to see a similar experiment using these other bones. (hint, hint!) Awesome work by the way, best info on the subject I’ve seen!!

    1. Hi Liz,

      thank you so much for your kind words and question 🙂

      3 – 4 hours for beef bone broth sounds about right.

      Fish bone broth should only take roughly 15 minutes + Natural release. Make sure to add some ginger to remove some of the fishy smell.

      take care & have a great week
      Jacky

  20. When one of your recipes calls for chicken stock, can you use this? Do I have to make beef bone broth with beef bones when a recipe calls for beef stock? what about if a recipe calls for beef or chicken broth? Do I then dilute the bone broth? Does the gelatinous bone broth turn to liquid when you heat it? Thank you for taking time to answer as I’m a new user of instant pot & have never made bone broth before.

    1. Hi Marion,

      thank you for your questions 🙂

      You can use this when a recipe calls for chicken stock. Make sure not to add any salt into the broth.

      Beef bone broth will require beef bones. You can also use the beef bone broth if a recipe calls for beef stock.

      You will not have to dilute the bone broth and the gelatinous bone broth will turn to liquid once heated.

      Have a great weekend!
      Jacky

  21. After freezing the bone broth, when you take out to use are you using it straight or adding water? I made broth with ham hocks, froze it then I used it straight for split pea soup. Should I have diluted? The soup was great. Thanks in advance, I love your site!

    1. Hi Jeanne,

      Thank you for your kind words and question 🙂

      Both ways will work. You can use it straight for soup or dilute it if you want a more mild taste.

      Happy New Year to you and your family
      Jacky

  22. I used 5 lbs of beef bones with marrow from a butcher shop and preroasted them before they went into my IP with veggies. I ran them through the process 2 times. I have a layer of fat, and the broth is thick but not gelatinous. I followed the directions. Any ideas of what I may have missed. It tastes good, but I would like it thick like your picture!

    1. Hi Beth,

      thank you for your kind words and question 🙂

      You will need some bones from the knuckle area. I would add some chicken feet in.

      Happy New Year to you and your family
      Jacky

  23. I love all the testing that you do, so thank you for that. I have a question about the chicken feet. How the heck do you clean them enough to know you aren’t submerging all the “stuff” they were walking on before their feet came off to be processed. I can get chicken feet…just don’t want the “extra” stuff. LOL. How many would you add to a pot of a mix of bones?
    ~debbie.

    1. Hi Debora,

      thank you for your kind words and question 🙂

      You can soak the chicken feet in water or parboil them first.

      You can also clean them with some coarse salt as well 🙂

      I would add 6 – 8 chicken feet to the broth

      Happy New Year to you and your family
      Jacky

  24. If I were do make a batch of broth close to bedtime (and not want to mess with straining, etc. before I went to bed) do you think it would affect the quality or safety of the broth if I left it on the keep warm setting until the morning and then finished things up?

    1. Hi Kendra,

      thank you for your question 🙂

      We haven’t tried it, but I think it will look very similar to our test #7 and #8.

      In general, you don’t want to leave food out for more than 4 hours even on keep warm mode.

      Happy New Year to you and your family
      Jacky

  25. Question, at the end of step 1 do you leave the bones in the IP, or remove them and just use the chicken feet to finish?

  26. Absolutely PERFECT! Thank you. My regular go-to from now on. Deleted all previous recipe cards, and I need a bigger freezer 🙂

  27. Hi, thanks for doing this experiment! Just wondering, why all the N/As for the chilling results with the longer cooking times? Did these broths not gel at all, or did you not chill them?
    Thanks!

    1. Hi Ben,

      thank you for your kind words 🙂

      I don’t recall what happened. I think We have chilled the #7 & #8 and they were gelatinous like #5 & #6. We didn’t chill the #9 & #10 as they didn’t really taste all that great hehe!

      Take care & have a great weekend
      Jacky

  28. Hi Amy & Jacky

    Thank you for putting this recipe, there’s so much data to take in. I’m about to try out your recipe today.

    I do have questions. Would roasting the bones in an oven for an hour create a broth similar taste and texture as sautéing them? Do you thinking roasting the vegetables along with the bones would be a good idea?

    Thanks
    James

    1. Hi James,

      thank you so much for your question 🙂

      We actually prefer roasting in the oven as it intensifies & concentrates the flavor better than sautéing.

      Roasting the bones and vegetables together will be a great idea if you want complex flavor for your bone broth!

      Take care & have fun cooking!
      Jacky

  29. Thank you for the information! It really taught me a lot. But the thing is.. I already cooked my chicken bone broth in pressure cooker for 18 hours, not knowing the differences btw slow cooker and pressure cooker. Now.. what should I do? Should I drain it away? The soup tastes a bit sour(it used to be bit sour when I cooked it on a slow cooker tho) but overall, it doesn’t taste bad. I’m worried, as in #9, my stock has gone bad.. Thank you again for enlightening me for the precious info!

    1. Hi Yumi,

      thank you for your kind words and question 🙂

      If you can stand the taste, it will still be fine to drink.
      You can also dilute it a bit and use it as chicken stock in recipes.

      Take care & have a great week
      Jacky

  30. My old-fashion way is similar to cooking dried beans (after a good 400’F oven roast of the meaty bones with marrow (umami) with vegetables. Bring to a boil slowly and skim (45 minues), completely cover and rest for 1/2 to 1 hour; do it again; do it again 3rd time; once more; cool and leave overnight in the ‘fridge. Scrape away & discard most of the top hardened fat –leaving some for flavor and “finish” for taste. Re-boil, remove all solids to a colendar in a stainless bowl, to reuse the drippings. Discard or use one more time for a thinner broth to reduce and add. However, I add Kitchen Boquet for color & taste. Then I later add golden sauted sweet onions (rather than package/Spanish Onions) sliced in half and rather thick (1/4 inch). I let the onions marinade in the broth “reduction” for a couple of hours to overnight. Then I use crushed garlic toasted on good french bread slices that incorporate various swiss cheeses and other softer cheeses to incorporate and balance. I too like a couple of Bay Leaves in the original stock, as well as chicken parts/bones & feet when available. Pork or veal feet also provides plenty of gelatin and flavor; marrow in sliced bones or split bones improve the product. THAT IS WHY THE FOS (French Onion Soup) IS EXPENSIVE IN A GOURMET RESTAURANT.

    1. Hi Edd,

      thank you so much for your comment and sharing your cooking experience with us!

      Your version of French Onion Soup sounds heavenly 🙂

      Take care & have a great week!
      Jacky

  31. I bought an Instant Pot because I wanted to make a good, faster bone broth. It was the very first thing I made with my new Instant Pot. I was so nervous trying to figure out if I was using the pot correctly, and what exactly Natural Release entailed. But I just let pot sit after the 2 hours until the silver thingie dropped (took about 1.5 hours to drop). Result was AMAZING flavorful broth!! Bones that crumbled to the touch and it didn’t take me 24 hours in a crockpot to do it. I am SOOOOO excited! Thank you for this easy to follow recipe. I am now an Instant Pot fan!!

  32. This is very informative…thank you! Are there certain bones that are more nutrient rich than others? Many comments have said they use rotisserie chicken bones…where is the best place to get bones?

    1. Hi Andrea,

      thank you for your question 🙂

      High quality bones (What the animal eat can be important) are important if you are looking for more nutrients.

      A butcher shop is a good place to get bones as they will usually have some in the freezer. You can also use leftover bones from dinner!

      Take care & have fun cooking
      Jacky

  33. Hi,

    Thank you for the awesome instructions and beautiful pictures. In the picture of the bones you used, there is quite a bit of meat on them. Did you leave the meat on the bones to make the bone broth?

    Thanks!
    Mia

  34. Hi Amy and Jacky,
    Can I use frozen chicken parts? I have a bag in freezer and wonder if timing is the same. 2 hrs in InstantPot.
    Thank you.
    AnnaA

  35. Hi, first off I love your recipes! I was wondering if you could use the left over bones from the Thanksgiving turkey to make this, or does it have to be raw?

    Thank you!
    Rene’

  36. Thank you for sharing this recipe. It was the best bone broth I have ever made. I used the carcass from a Costco rotisserie chicken and skipped the fresh herbs. I used 1 tbsp soy and 1 tbsp fish sauce. I then used the broth for your congee and a chicken tortilla soup. Both results were phenomenal. Thank you!

  37. I have a 10qt pot for meats and graveys, and I am thinking of getting a 4qt or a 6qt to cook side dishes and vegs. Your commets.

  38. This is so cool, thank you for sharing. I love drinking bone broth but don’t know how to make one. I hope I can cook your recipe one of these days. I’m now drinking Au Bon Broth and so far it’s the best for me. I love its taste like it’s home made and that it’s organic.

  39. Hi Amy & Jacky,

    I see the nutritional information for a “serving.” What is the size of this serving? 1/2 cup bone broth?

    Also, this is pretty much the ingredient list for making stock in my family (minus the apple cider vinegar). What is the difference between bone broth and stock? Just something I’ve been curious about…..

    1. Hi J Barton,

      thank you for your questions 🙂

      Yes it is 1/2 cup of bone broth.

      Stock and bone broth is extremely similar. The major difference is the additional seasoning & apple cider vinegar to extract more nutrients from the bones. I also add apple cider vinegar to my stock so I would say the major difference is the additional seasoning.

      Take care & have fun cooking
      Jacky

    1. Hi Alvin,

      thank you for your question 🙂

      The bones will be mostly tasteless by then. We sometimes dip the meat with some light soy sauce and eat them for snack.

      Take care & have fun cooking
      Jacky

  40. The recipe mentions “your favorite herbs” – can you give some recommendations for good ones or combos to use?

  41. Great post. I love that you did this!

    After years and years of broth, the IP was the first time I got gelatinous bone broth. I have chronic health issues so can only do so much in the kitchen, so I make bone broth with Whole Foods rotisserie chicken, skin/bones/little bit of meat, and pre-cut veggies. I did 90 min, but I’ll bump it up to 2 hours. Thanks for the advice on dicing.

    1. Hi Cindy,

      thank you for your question 🙂

      Chicken feet from stores are usually pretty clean.
      An optional step is to declaw them.

      Take care & have fun cooking
      Jacky

  42. In your bone broth recipe you use both bones and chicken feet. Are the bones beef bones or chicken bones? I appreciate your experimental methods to find the best way to do something.

    1. Hi Adele,

      thank you for your kind words and question 🙂

      We used 2.5 – 3 pounds (1198g) bones (combination of 554g pork, 644g chicken)

      Take care & have fun cooking
      Jacky

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