Chinese Century Egg & Pork Congee in Pressure Cooker 皮蛋瘦肉粥

10 ingredients + 10 mins prep to make this comforting Chinese Century Egg & Pork Congee in Pressure Cooker Recipe 皮蛋瘦肉粥! Creamy rice porridge with moist shredded pork plus chewy century eggs. Easy & healthy one pot meal that is sooo satisfying to eat!

10 ingredients + 10 mins prep to make this comforting Chinese Century Egg & Pork Congee in Pressure Cooker Recipe 皮蛋瘦肉粥! Creamy rice porridge with moist shredded pork plus chewy century eggs. Easy & healthy one pot meal that is sooo satisfying to eat!

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If you enjoyed our Chicken Congee (Rice Porridge or Jook) in Pressure Cooker Recipe (you can read a little more on congee here), then you have to try this Chinese Century Egg & Pork Congee!!

Chinese Century Egg & Pork Congee has a very special place in Jacky’s heart. Each spoonful of this savory deliciousness brought him back to his childhood days in Hong Kong.

Every morning, a hawker would setup his rustic wooden cart with a stove just outside his house. Each day, he would sell bowls after bowls of piping hot congee for those in need of a quick breakfast or lunch.

Chinese Century Egg & Pork Congee in Pressure Cooker Recipe 皮蛋瘦肉粥 Ingredients

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Since the 50’s, many unemployed grassroots were forced to become hawkers selling street food to maintain their livelihoods. You can easily find hawkers selling a wide variety of cheap sweet and savory street food from stinky tofu to egg waffles to curry fish balls. True classics of Hong Kong.

One day, his dad came out of the kitchen with lunch ready on the table. Normally, Jacky would jump to eat with full excitement, but he didn’t that day. He was having a fever.

His dad knew the congee from the hawker was his favorite, so his dad quickly ran and bought him a comforting bowl of Chinese Century Egg & Pork Congee. It warmed his heart to this day.

Chinese Century Egg & Pork Congee became Jacky’s favorite congee ever since.

So, what are these weird looking jello-y black eggs? These are Century Eggs!
century egg 皮蛋, pidan, preserved egg, hundred-year egg, thousand-year egg

What is a Century Egg?

You may have heard others talked about pidan 皮蛋, preserved egg, hundred-year egg, thousand-year egg, or millennium egg before. They’re all referring to this dark brown Century egg!

Century eggs are Chinese preserved duck eggs likely created to prevent the eggs from spoiling when they were plenty.

You can eat century eggs as is or as a side dish with additional toppings & seasonings. As much as we love eating century eggs, we personally enjoy them best in congee. We rarely eat it plain though, due to it’s distinct flavor.

How are Century Eggs made?

Century eggs are produced by a Chinese egg preservation method believed to have over five centuries of history. The traditional method wraps the egg with a layer of salt clay mixture and let it cure for up to weeks or months.

The resulting yolk is creamy and dark green/grey in color, while the white becomes chewy/jello-y and translucent dark brown.

Tools for Chinese Century Egg & Pork Congee in Pressure Cooker Recipe

10 ingredients + 10 mins prep to make this comforting Chinese Century Egg & Pork Congee in Pressure Cooker Recipe 皮蛋瘦肉粥! Creamy rice porridge with moist shredded pork plus chewy century eggs. Easy & healthy one pot meal that is sooo satisfying to eat!

Tips for Chinese Century Egg & Pork Congee in Pressure Cooker Recipe

1. Cooking Congee in Pressure Cooker: We LOVE cooking congee in our electric pressure cookers! It’s easy, saves time and no need to babysit the pot. The best thing about this recipe is how the pressure cooker extracts tons of flavor from the pork bones to create a comforting congee full of depth of flavor. It’s amazing how it tastes like the congee has been cooking on the stove for a long period of time to achieve such flavors and texture.

2. Types of Pork Meat: we tested the recipe with and without pork bones and found the pork bones made a BIG difference on the overall taste of the final dish.

We chose to use pork bones + pork shank as the final ingredients for this recipe instead of the standard lean pork because they greatly increase the congee’s depth of flavor. Plus, the resulting shredded pork was more moist than regular lean pork thanks to the fat in the pork meat.

3. Preparing Century Eggs: we like to wash our century eggs with cold running tap water before cooking.

4. Rinsing the Rice: If you are rinsing the rice, ensure to drain well and remove 3 tablespoons of water from the 6 1/2 cup of water to retain the accurate water-to-rice ratio for this recipe.

5. Additional Toppings & Seasonings: Feel free to add sesame oil or additional toppings/condiments (such as zhacai 榨菜, pork floss 豬肉鬆). Awesome if you can serve it with Chinese doughnut (Youtiao 油條 or You Char Kway 油炸鬼)!

Watch How To Make This Chinese Century Egg & Pork Congee in Pressure Cooker:

Can’t see the cooking video? Watch it here.

Now it’s YOUR turn to take out your pressure cooker and make some Chinese Century Egg & Pork Congee in Pressure Cooker 皮蛋瘦肉粥!

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5.0 from 4 reviews
Chinese Century Egg & Pork Congee in Pressure Cooker 皮蛋瘦肉粥
 
Prep
Cook
Total
 
10 ingredients + 10 mins prep to make this comforting Chinese Century Egg & Pork Congee in Pressure Cooker Recipe. Easy, healthy & flavorful one pot meal!
Author:
Recipe type: Breakfast, Brunch, Dinner, Lunch, Main Course, Meat, One Pot Meals, Rice, Easy
Cuisine: Chinese
Serving: 2 - 4
Ingredients
  • ¾ cup (173 g) Jasmine rice (using standard 250ml measuring cup)
  • 6 ½ standard measuring cups (1625 ml) cold running tap water
  • 1 pound pork shank
  • 1 pound pork bones
  • 2 thin slices ginger (8 grams)
  • 3 century eggs, cut into 8 – 10 pieces per egg
  • Salt to taste
Pork seasoning
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • ¼ teaspoon sesame oil
  • A dash of ground white pepper
Instructions
  1. Optional Cleaning Step: Bring 3.5L of water to a boil. Then, boil the pork shank and pork bones for 3 minutes to clean and remove the excess fat. Remove and rinse in cold tap water. We take this step whenever we make Chinese soups with pork shank or any other bones and meat.
  2. Pressure Cook the Pork Congee: Place 173g of Jasmine rice, 1lb pork shank, 1lb pork bones, 2 thin slices of ginger, and 6 ½ cups (1625ml) of cold running tap water into the pressure cooker. Close lid and cook at High Pressure for 35 minutes. Turn off the heat and Natural Release for 20 minutes. Manually release the remaining pressure by carefully turning the venting knob to the venting position. Open the lid carefully.
  3. Shred Pork Shank: Remove pork shank and pork bones from the pressure cooker. Shred and season the pork shank (and meat from pork bones) with ½ tsp of salt, ¼ tsp sesame oil, and a dash of ground white pepper. The pork meat should be slightly too salty. Please taste the seasoning and adjust accordingly.
  4. Thicken the Congee: Turn heat to medium (Instant Pot: Press sauté button, Tatung Pressure Cooker: Press Meat/Chicken Button). Add the century eggs and shredded pork shank meat into the pressure cooker. Taste & season with salt and stir until desired consistency.
  5. Serve: Garnish with green onions and serve!
Notes
Preparing Century Eggs: we like to wash our century eggs with cold running tap water before cooking.

Types of Pork Meat: pork bones + pork shank greatly increase the congee’s depth of flavor.

Rinsing the Rice: If you rinse the rice, ensure to drain well and remove 3 tablespoons of water from the 6½ cup of water to retain accurate water-to-rice ratio.

Additional Toppings & Seasonings: Feel free to add sesame oil or additional toppings/condiments (such as zhacai, pork floss, Chinese doughnut).
10 ingredients + 10 mins prep to make this comforting Chinese Century Egg & Pork Congee in Pressure Cooker Recipe 皮蛋瘦肉粥! Creamy rice porridge with moist shredded pork plus chewy century eggs. Easy & healthy one pot meal that is sooo satisfying to eat!
Food Lovers in our 30s who worked directly with Instant Pot CEO, Manufacturers, and 35+ Restaurants. Culinary Families & Food Magazine Publishers.
  1. Thanks Amy and Jacky…this was amazing! Even better than the local Canto restaurants. My husband Jack (who used to go by Jackie in the 80s) reminisces about the jook in Hong Kong from his childhood. This was pretty close according to him. Even my 3 year old gobbled it all up. Thank you for this amazing recipe! Maybe another one on how to make the Chinese Donut to go with it??? ?

    1. Hi Tina,

      Hope you and your husband Jack had a wonderful New Year 🙂
      Thank you so much for your kind words on the recipe!

      Chinese Donuts need to be fried so can’t do it in the Instant Pot hehe!

      Happy New Year & please take care
      Jacky

    1. Hi Yun,

      Hope you had a wonderful New Year & Christmas 🙂
      Thank you for your question. The volume written in the recipe will work fine unless you want more congee.

      Happy New Year & please take care
      Jacky

  2. My family loves Jook and we finish the whole pot in one day. Can I double the quantity or will it cause overflow in the instant pot?

    1. Hi Corrina,

      Hope you had a wonderful New Year & Christmas 🙂
      Thank you for your question. For a 8 quart Instant Pot, 1.5x the recipe will be fine.

      Happy New Year & please take care
      Jacky

  3. Can’t wait to try this recipe! My husband And I fell in love with congee years ago and we can’t wait to introduce our kids to it now. I usually make pork or beef broth from raw, frozen bones. If using raw frozen bones is 35 minutes under pressure enough? My instinct would be to make the bone broth first and then use broth, water and rice for the porridge. What do you think? 🙂

    1. Hi Susie,

      Hope you had a wonderful New Year & Christmas 🙂
      Thank you so much for your kind words on the recipe!

      The congee should still be pretty tasty after cooking 35 minutes with the raw frozen bones.

      Happy New Year & please take care
      Jacky

  4. I love your recipes, all the chinese food are so comforting specially when I’m away from home. Just wonder though for this, could I use spare ribs instead of shank as I don’t like the texture of shank too much. If I could use spare ribs, how would the cooking time vary or water need to be adjusted? Thank you so much and hope you both have a happy new year 🙂

  5. We don’t eat much pork in our family, could ground beef be substituted? (I know the flavor would be different) just wondering if you had tried beef during your trials! Thanks for all the great recipes!

    1. Hi Hilary,

      thank you for your question 🙂

      Both will work. We modified the recipe to 173g of rice as we thought it was better.

      Take care & have fun cooking
      Jacky

  6. So happy you have this site! I live in a rural area with no access to Asian markets. What would you recommend as a substitute for the century egg? Also, have you tried the ones on Amazon, and if so, do you recommend them? Thanks for your help! Can’t wait to make this!

  7. I made this and it turned out great! One adjustment would be the amount of pork shank. When I make this again I’ll just use 1/2lb or maybe save half of the cooked pork shank for another dish. I will also cube the pork instead of shredding it- I like little bits of pork in my congee as opposed to shredded meat. Thanks for the great recipe!

  8. I’ve been using your chicken congee recipe over and over in my IP! I’d like to make this, but have a question. In this recipe you only use 6.5 cups of water, but 7 for the chicken congee recipe. Can you explain the reason for this?

    Thank you so much for your wonderful recipes, and for the great FB group!!

    1. Hi Dani,

      thank you so much for your kind words and great question 🙂

      Good catch! We thought this recipe benefits from the more concentrated flavor and the thicker congee base as the ingredients (such as century eggs) are more bold in flavor.

      Take care & have fun cooking
      Jacky

  9. I’m glad I found your blog. Can you make a recipes for beef rendang, it’s Indonesian beef curry. I’m Chinese but born in indonesia. So we always missed this dish while living here in the state and to manual cooked this dish is time consuming. Matbe using instapot can help reduce the timing.Thanks for advance.

    1. Hi Mery,
      Glad you found us too! How wonderful!! My dad is also Indonesian-born-Chinese, so I grew up eating various Indonesian dishes he recreated from his childhood…satay, Yellow Rice (Nasi Kuning), gado gado, beef rendang…so much yummy food! Thank you for your suggestion. We do have a long to-make list, but I’ve just added beef rendang to our list! 🙂
      Happy Chinese New Year! Hope to see you around!
      Amy

    1. Hi Jenni,

      thank you for your comment!

      Brown rice congee is usually thicker than white rice congee.
      The cooking time should remain the same, but please reduce the water to 5.5 cups instead of 7 ?

      Happy New Year & Have fun cooking!
      Jacky

  10. Thank you sooo much for posting Asian dishes cooked in instant pot 🙂 very helpful . Just curious, do you happen to have a Chinese version of recipe? I would love to share it with my mom who also uses iP

    1. Thank you so much for leaving a comment Linda 🙂
      Hope to see you cooking in a pressure cooker soon!

      Shoot us an email if you have any questions.

      Have fun cooking!
      Jacky

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